Gliding

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Female (from the blue smudge on its neck) Common Flying Dragon (Draco sumatranus) snapped in Sungei Buloh mangroves, Singapore.
Feb 1, 2012 / 3 notes

Female (from the blue smudge on its neck) Common Flying Dragon (Draco sumatranus) snapped in Sungei Buloh mangroves, Singapore.

The Malayan Colugo (Galeopterus variegatus) or Flying Lemur isn’t really a Lemur and can’t really fly so we’ll stick to Colugo. What it can do very well however, is glide. Glides of 150m in horizontal distance have been recorded. I personally have seen them swerve trees mid flight. One of two species in the family Dermoptera, the Colugo is spectacularly odd. Photo from Pulau Tioman, Malaysia.
Jan 28, 2012 / 4 notes

The Malayan Colugo (Galeopterus variegatus) or Flying Lemur isn’t really a Lemur and can’t really fly so we’ll stick to Colugo. What it can do very well however, is glide. Glides of 150m in horizontal distance have been recorded. I personally have seen them swerve trees mid flight. One of two species in the family Dermoptera, the Colugo is spectacularly odd. Photo from Pulau Tioman, Malaysia.

The Black bearded Flying Dragon (Draco melanopogon) is a common inhabitant of the forest on Pulau Tioman, Malaysia. It uses skin flaps over its ribs which can spring out to form “wings” to help it glide between trees in the forest. That way they can avoid venturing to the forest floor where there are many more predators. Except of course when the female (pictured) has to lay her eggs.
Jan 11, 2012 / 4 notes

The Black bearded Flying Dragon (Draco melanopogon) is a common inhabitant of the forest on Pulau Tioman, Malaysia. It uses skin flaps over its ribs which can spring out to form “wings” to help it glide between trees in the forest. That way they can avoid venturing to the forest floor where there are many more predators. Except of course when the female (pictured) has to lay her eggs.

The Malayan Colugo (Galeopterus variegatus) the most adept of the “flying” mammals, being able to glide up to 150m between trees while searching for young leaves and sap.
Jan 7, 2012 / 9 notes

The Malayan Colugo (Galeopterus variegatus) the most adept of the “flying” mammals, being able to glide up to 150m between trees while searching for young leaves and sap.