amphibians

The Latest

Introduced in 1935, the Cane toad (Bufo marinus) is one of the most prominent and successful invasive species in Australia. It was originally introduced from specimens in Hawaii - although the species is native to Central and South America. Without showing any noticeable interest in the cane beetle it was introduced to control (as the cane beetle was eating sugar cane crops in northern Queensland), the Cane Toad spread unimpeded throught QLD to New South Wales and reached Northern Territory by the 1980s. It has a voracious appetite eating anything from insects, frogs and small possums. And basically no predators touch it due to its parotid glands that secrete a milky toxin often deadly to all those that try to consume it! Biological control people………..needs to be researched before you devastate a continents wildlife.
May 10, 2012

Introduced in 1935, the Cane toad (Bufo marinus) is one of the most prominent and successful invasive species in Australia. It was originally introduced from specimens in Hawaii - although the species is native to Central and South America. Without showing any noticeable interest in the cane beetle it was introduced to control (as the cane beetle was eating sugar cane crops in northern Queensland), the Cane Toad spread unimpeded throught QLD to New South Wales and reached Northern Territory by the 1980s. It has a voracious appetite eating anything from insects, frogs and small possums. And basically no predators touch it due to its parotid glands that secrete a milky toxin often deadly to all those that try to consume it! Biological control people………..needs to be researched before you devastate a continents wildlife.

Common Name: Green Tree Frog Latin Name: Litoria caerulia Distribution: Southern New Guinea, northern and eastern Australia. Introduced into USA and local populations found in Florida. IUCN Status: Least Concern Habitat and Ecology: Dry wooded forests, near streams, rock crevices and hollow trees - and patio door windows! Breeding occurs between November to February and the broods are surface-laid in numbers of 200-2000 eggs. Threats: Pollution, Predation from cats and dogs, Cane Toads. Local populations may also be affected harvesting for pet trade. Chytrid fungus has also been witnessed in some populations. Conservation status: Numerous in the many protected areas in Australia. Breeding in some zoos has already taken place. Rules on collection and prohibition of keeping frogs already in place in Australia but tighter restrictions on the harvest and use of animals in the pet trade needed globally.
(Source: http://www.iucnredlist.org/apps/redlist/details/41082/0) 
Feb 12, 2012 / 10 notes

Common Name: Green Tree Frog Latin Name: Litoria caerulia Distribution: Southern New Guinea, northern and eastern Australia. Introduced into USA and local populations found in Florida. IUCN Status: Least Concern Habitat and Ecology: Dry wooded forests, near streams, rock crevices and hollow trees - and patio door windows! Breeding occurs between November to February and the broods are surface-laid in numbers of 200-2000 eggs. Threats: Pollution, Predation from cats and dogs, Cane Toads. Local populations may also be affected harvesting for pet trade. Chytrid fungus has also been witnessed in some populations. Conservation status: Numerous in the many protected areas in Australia. Breeding in some zoos has already taken place. Rules on collection and prohibition of keeping frogs already in place in Australia but tighter restrictions on the harvest and use of animals in the pet trade needed globally.

(Source: http://www.iucnredlist.org/apps/redlist/details/41082/0