animals

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Brahminy Kite (Haliastur indus) on Flickr.
One of the more medium sized raptors to be found in eastern Australia, the Brahminy Kite is also a bird of prey that can fish!
Jul 8, 2012

Brahminy Kite (Haliastur indus) on Flickr.

One of the more medium sized raptors to be found in eastern Australia, the Brahminy Kite is also a bird of prey that can fish!

Rainbow Lorikeet (Trichoglossus haematodus) on Flickr.
Up close, these are probably the most beautiful bird I’ve ever seen
Jun 19, 2012 / 19 notes

Rainbow Lorikeet (Trichoglossus haematodus) on Flickr.

Up close, these are probably the most beautiful bird I’ve ever seen

Black Flying Fox (Pteropus alecto) on Flickr.
The Black Flying fox is one of 4 species of flying fox in Australia. The Black, the Grey Headed, Little Red and Spectacled FLying fox all belong to the genus Pteropus which holds the largest bats in the world.
Jun 14, 2012

Black Flying Fox (Pteropus alecto) on Flickr.

The Black Flying fox is one of 4 species of flying fox in Australia. The Black, the Grey Headed, Little Red and Spectacled FLying fox all belong to the genus Pteropus which holds the largest bats in the world.

White-bellied fish eagle (Haliaeetus leucogaster) is a huge powerful raptor that preys on anything from small mammals, birds, fish and snakes. This is one of Australia’s biggest birds of prey, second only to the Wedge-tail Eagle.
May 20, 2012 / 1 note

White-bellied fish eagle (Haliaeetus leucogaster) is a huge powerful raptor that preys on anything from small mammals, birds, fish and snakes. This is one of Australia’s biggest birds of prey, second only to the Wedge-tail Eagle.

A Cicada emerges from its larval case, displaying its adult form. Cicadas may spend years underground before emerging for a brief adult life that may last only weeks.
May 18, 2012 / 11 notes

A Cicada emerges from its larval case, displaying its adult form. Cicadas may spend years underground before emerging for a brief adult life that may last only weeks.

Tawny Frogmouths (Podargus strigoides) are often mis-identified as Australian owls. Frogmouths are actually more closely related to Nightjars although share the nocturnal predatory behaviour of owls. Frogmouths however do not have the same powerful talons that owls have, choosing to take smaller prey with their beak. During the day, they rely heavily on their camouflage, finding a suitable paper bark melaleuca, tilting their heads upwards, shutting their eyes and blending in.
May 16, 2012 / 4 notes

Tawny Frogmouths (Podargus strigoides) are often mis-identified as Australian owls. Frogmouths are actually more closely related to Nightjars although share the nocturnal predatory behaviour of owls. Frogmouths however do not have the same powerful talons that owls have, choosing to take smaller prey with their beak. During the day, they rely heavily on their camouflage, finding a suitable paper bark melaleuca, tilting their heads upwards, shutting their eyes and blending in.

An Australian Darter (Anhinga novaehollandiae) drying its wings in the sun after a fishing session. The Darter is in the same order as cormorants and looks very similar (if not a bit more snakey - hence their nick name “snakebirds”). Very well adapted to an amphibious lifestyle, the bird inhabits and hunts for fish in both freshwater and brackish water environments, very rarely in salty or estuarine habitats
May 13, 2012 / 1 note

An Australian Darter (Anhinga novaehollandiae) drying its wings in the sun after a fishing session. The Darter is in the same order as cormorants and looks very similar (if not a bit more snakey - hence their nick name “snakebirds”). Very well adapted to an amphibious lifestyle, the bird inhabits and hunts for fish in both freshwater and brackish water environments, very rarely in salty or estuarine habitats

Introduced in 1935, the Cane toad (Bufo marinus) is one of the most prominent and successful invasive species in Australia. It was originally introduced from specimens in Hawaii - although the species is native to Central and South America. Without showing any noticeable interest in the cane beetle it was introduced to control (as the cane beetle was eating sugar cane crops in northern Queensland), the Cane Toad spread unimpeded throught QLD to New South Wales and reached Northern Territory by the 1980s. It has a voracious appetite eating anything from insects, frogs and small possums. And basically no predators touch it due to its parotid glands that secrete a milky toxin often deadly to all those that try to consume it! Biological control people………..needs to be researched before you devastate a continents wildlife.
May 10, 2012

Introduced in 1935, the Cane toad (Bufo marinus) is one of the most prominent and successful invasive species in Australia. It was originally introduced from specimens in Hawaii - although the species is native to Central and South America. Without showing any noticeable interest in the cane beetle it was introduced to control (as the cane beetle was eating sugar cane crops in northern Queensland), the Cane Toad spread unimpeded throught QLD to New South Wales and reached Northern Territory by the 1980s. It has a voracious appetite eating anything from insects, frogs and small possums. And basically no predators touch it due to its parotid glands that secrete a milky toxin often deadly to all those that try to consume it! Biological control people………..needs to be researched before you devastate a continents wildlife.

Boondal Wetlands is a lovely little oasis of mangroves, eucalypt forest and swampy melaleuca woodland located within Brisbane’s leafy suburbs.
May 10, 2012 / 2 notes

Boondal Wetlands is a lovely little oasis of mangroves, eucalypt forest and swampy melaleuca woodland located within Brisbane’s leafy suburbs.

The Noisy Pitta (Pitta versicolor) is a beautiful bird found throughout Indonesia, PNG and Australia searching around for small inverts in scrubby eucalypt forest, sub-tropical and tropical rainforest. 
May 9, 2012 / 2 notes

The Noisy Pitta (Pitta versicolor) is a beautiful bird found throughout Indonesia, PNG and Australia searching around for small inverts in scrubby eucalypt forest, sub-tropical and tropical rainforest. 

Male King Parrot (Alisterus scapularis) in the hilly hinterlands behind Gold Coast, Eastern Australia.
May 7, 2012

Male King Parrot (Alisterus scapularis) in the hilly hinterlands behind Gold Coast, Eastern Australia.

On their migration between their feeding grounds in the Antarctic and their breeding grounds in the tropics, male Southern Humpback Whales (Megaptera novaeangliae) compete in colossal battles, vying for the females attentions in epic mating runs. The males continually slam into each others’ sides, often leaping clear of the water to achieve the hardest blow.
Apr 4, 2012

On their migration between their feeding grounds in the Antarctic and their breeding grounds in the tropics, male Southern Humpback Whales (Megaptera novaeangliae) compete in colossal battles, vying for the females attentions in epic mating runs. The males continually slam into each others’ sides, often leaping clear of the water to achieve the hardest blow.

Skimmer Dragonfly hawking for midges in the afternoon light takes a well deserved and timely break as I walked past with my camera!
Apr 2, 2012

Skimmer Dragonfly hawking for midges in the afternoon light takes a well deserved and timely break as I walked past with my camera!

Orb Web spiders all around the world, including the families that live here in Australia combine a variety of factors in the behaviour and physiology to prevent themselves sticking to their own webs (1) Hairs on the spider reduce the surface area of contact of the leg to the web (2) A chemical resin that is secreted by the spider also seems to reduce adhesion to the web (3) they move delicately, sometimes moving on to tip toes when the web shakes (pictured).
Mar 29, 2012 / 3 notes

Orb Web spiders all around the world, including the families that live here in Australia combine a variety of factors in the behaviour and physiology to prevent themselves sticking to their own webs (1) Hairs on the spider reduce the surface area of contact of the leg to the web (2) A chemical resin that is secreted by the spider also seems to reduce adhesion to the web (3) they move delicately, sometimes moving on to tip toes when the web shakes (pictured).