reptile

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Australian Freshwater Crocodile (Crocodylus johnsoni) is one of the smaller crocodilians in Aus. Growing to a maximum of 3m, they prey on medium sized prey from birds and bats to wallabies and reptiles.
Mar 18, 2012 / 11 notes

Australian Freshwater Crocodile (Crocodylus johnsoni) is one of the smaller crocodilians in Aus. Growing to a maximum of 3m, they prey on medium sized prey from birds and bats to wallabies and reptiles.

Common Name: Eastern Blue-tongued Lizard/ Skink Latin Name: Tiliqua scincoides scincoides Distribution: Eastern Australia IUCN Status: Not assessed (although Adelaide Pygmy Blue Tongued Skink listed as Endangered) Size: 30-60cm in length Habitat and Ecology: Large skink with bright blue tongue. Found in dry bush and suburbia they hiss loudly when disturbed or threatened. They give birth to a live litter of between 6-20 individuals. Diet: Omnivorous - feeding on (slow) inverts such as slugs, beetles and possess strong jaws for crushing snails and fruits like guava.   
Feb 14, 2012 / 1 note

Common Name: Eastern Blue-tongued Lizard/ Skink Latin Name: Tiliqua scincoides scincoides Distribution: Eastern Australia IUCN Status: Not assessed (although Adelaide Pygmy Blue Tongued Skink listed as Endangered) Size: 30-60cm in length Habitat and Ecology: Large skink with bright blue tongue. Found in dry bush and suburbia they hiss loudly when disturbed or threatened. They give birth to a live litter of between 6-20 individuals. Diet: Omnivorous - feeding on (slow) inverts such as slugs, beetles and possess strong jaws for crushing snails and fruits like guava.   

Feb 8, 2012 / 1 note

AUSTRALIA!!

Sunset on a trip into Brisbane’s incredible Mt Nebo and surrounding national park.


So here I find myself in 2012, living in the sunshine state - south-east Queensland, in central Brisbane. This is my third trip to Australia and ever since I first came here, the wild heritage of this vast continent completely fascinates me. Everything here mystifies me, all the wildlife is so colourful and delightfully strange compared with everywhere on earth. 

The marine biodiversity is breathtaking even at these sub-tropical lattitudes. In an incredibly insignificant 8 dives in this country I have come across Reef Manta Rays, Grey Nurse Sharks, Leopard Sharks, Eagle rays, Devil rays, schooling Cownose rays, Bull rays, Cowtail Stingrays, Giant Groupers, Green, Hawksbill and Loggerhead Turtles and singing Humpback Whales!! 

Then comes the terrestrial fauna, from the huge array of marsupials, the incredible and bizarre monotremes, large and weird lizards and the birds. Australia’s bird life is SENSATIONAL. In the coming few months I hope I can portray just a notion of this massive island’s beauty. And that my friends is what the posts following this will be all about.

Female (from the blue smudge on its neck) Common Flying Dragon (Draco sumatranus) snapped in Sungei Buloh mangroves, Singapore.
Feb 1, 2012 / 3 notes

Female (from the blue smudge on its neck) Common Flying Dragon (Draco sumatranus) snapped in Sungei Buloh mangroves, Singapore.

Water Monitor (Varanus salvator) swims casually through the murky mangrove of Singapore.
Jan 28, 2012 / 1 note

Water Monitor (Varanus salvator) swims casually through the murky mangrove of Singapore.

The Black bearded Flying Dragon (Draco melanopogon) is a common inhabitant of the forest on Pulau Tioman, Malaysia. It uses skin flaps over its ribs which can spring out to form “wings” to help it glide between trees in the forest. That way they can avoid venturing to the forest floor where there are many more predators. Except of course when the female (pictured) has to lay her eggs.
Jan 11, 2012 / 4 notes

The Black bearded Flying Dragon (Draco melanopogon) is a common inhabitant of the forest on Pulau Tioman, Malaysia. It uses skin flaps over its ribs which can spring out to form “wings” to help it glide between trees in the forest. That way they can avoid venturing to the forest floor where there are many more predators. Except of course when the female (pictured) has to lay her eggs.

A Water Monitor (Varanus salvator) tastes the air in Singapore’s wetlands.
Dec 29, 2011 / 33 notes

A Water Monitor (Varanus salvator) tastes the air in Singapore’s wetlands.

The common and invasive Changeable Lizard (Calotes versicolor), Singapore.
Dec 21, 2011 / 12 notes

The common and invasive Changeable Lizard (Calotes versicolor), Singapore.